8592836999 9074594067 Phone
roshni.manojkumar@gmail.com Email

About Us


KMK Financial Services is founded by Manoj Kumar

KMK Financial Services strives to maintain ethical standards at all times and lays strong emphasis on honesty, integrity and confidentiality. 

It speaks and acts to ensure transparency at all levels and in everything it does, it’s a relationship beyond broking.

KMK Financial Services is drawn from a diversity of professional backgrounds, and blend of experience, skill and dedication is shared with its clients.

KMK Financial Services emphasizes adequate, thorough research local and world-wide developments, balancing these with the astute discovery of intrinsic values, synergies and growth. 

The aim is simply to help the investors to maximize their returns.

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Features

Family Account

Access your family member's Portfolio
with one single login

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Transact Online

Invest Online in Lumpsum or SIP
in mutual fund schemes.

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Save Tax

Check out Tax Savings
and Invest into ELSS Funds

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Reports

View your current market value,
your profits & losses.

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Calculators

Calculate the amount of wealth
required for your goal

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Factsheet

Explore Mutual Fund schemes
and their performance

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Focused Funds

Check out our recommended funds
and invest into them

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Market Views

Get monthly market outlook
from the experts

E-Locker

Upload and save
your important documents.

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Mobile App

Manage your wealth & track your family’s portfolio with one single login. You can easily and quickly invest in Mutual Funds from the app. Explore funds, view their performance and invest. Start an SIP or invest Lumpsum. Check out our recommendation of funds under Focused Funds. Whether you made profits or loss, check out from the reports. Simply Login and setup a 4 digit PIN for subsequent login so that you don’t need to enter your Username & Password every time. Download Now!

Mutual Funds

A mutual fund is a type of financial vehicle made up of a pool of money collected from many investors to invest in securities like stocks, bonds, money market instruments, and other assets. Mutual funds are operated by professional money managers, who allocate the fund's assets and attempt to produce capital gains or income for the fund's investors. A mutual fund's portfolio is structured and maintained to match the investment objectives stated in its prospectus.


Mutual funds give small or individual investors access to professionally managed portfolios of equities, bonds, and other securities. Each shareholder, therefore, participates proportionally in the gains or losses of the fund. Mutual funds invest in a vast number of securities, and performance is usually tracked as the change in the total market cap of the fund—derived by the aggregating performance of the underlying investments.

KEY TAKEAWAYS
A mutual fund is a type of investment vehicle consisting of a portfolio of stocks, bonds, or other securities. 
Mutual funds give small or individual investors access to diversified, professionally managed portfolios at a low price.
Mutual funds are divided into several kinds of categories, representing the kinds of securities they invest in, their investment objectives, and the type of returns they seek.
Mutual funds charge annual fees (called expense ratios) and, in some cases, commissions, which can affect their overall returns.
The overwhelming majority of money in employer-sponsored retirement plans goes into mutual funds.

Mutual funds pool money from the investing public and use that money to buy other securities, usually stocks and bonds. The value of the mutual fund company depends on the performance of the securities it decides to buy. So, when you buy a unit or share of a mutual fund, you are buying the performance of its portfolio or, more precisely, a part of the portfolio's value. Investing in a share of a mutual fund is different from investing in shares of stock. Unlike stock, mutual fund shares do not give its holders any voting rights. A share of a mutual fund represents investments in many different stocks (or other securities) instead of just one holding.

Investors typically earn a return from a mutual fund in three ways:

Income is earned from dividends on stocks and interest on bonds held in the fund's portfolio. A fund pays out nearly all of the income it receives over the year to fund owners in the form of a distribution. Funds often give investors a choice either to receive a check for distributions or to reinvest the earnings and get more shares.
If the fund sells securities that have increased in price, the fund has a capital gain. Most funds also pass on these gains to investors in a distribution.
If fund holdings increase in price but are not sold by the fund manager, the fund's shares increase in price. You can then sell your mutual fund shares for a profit in the market.
If a mutual fund is construed as a virtual company, its CEO is the fund manager, sometimes called its investment adviser. The fund manager is hired by a board of directors and is legally obligated to work in the best interest of mutual fund shareholders. Most fund managers are also owners of the fund. There are very few other employees in a mutual fund company. The investment adviser or fund manager may employ some analysts to help pick investments or perform market research. A fund accountant is kept on staff to calculate the fund's NAV, the daily value of the portfolio that determines if share prices go up or down. Mutual funds need to have a compliance officer or two, and probably an attorney, to keep up with government regulations. 
 

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Market Views

Please click here for Monthly Equity & Debt Outlook Presentation – Dec 2020 

 

Key Events:

 

  • Nifty (+11.4%) rallied sharply in November, as a global risk-on triggered by a Biden victory, positive vaccine developments and dollar weakness (DXY fell by ~2.3% in Nov) led to strong inflows into EM markets
  • FIIs pumped in ~$9.4bn into India equities (highest ever monthly net inflows) partly driven by MSCI rebalance, as >$2bn of passive inflows were expected due to increase in Foreign Ownership Limits in various stocks
  • DIIs on the other hand, continued to remain net sellers including Domestic MFs as equity funds witnessed fourth consecutive month of net outflow in October as redemptions grew 20% vs September
  • Deceleration in real GDP growth moderated to -7.5% y/y in 2Q (vs -23.9% in 1Q). Rebound was led by manufacturing (+0.6% y/y vs -39.3% in 1Q) while subdued govt. spending dragged growth
  • CPI spiked to 7.6% in October, highest print since May’14 while core CPI also rose slightly to 5.8%. While inflationary pressures were broad based, food items led the sharp jump, partly due to unseasonal rains
  • Govt’s latest measures focused on urban consumption, infrastructure and Covid-affected sectors. Moreover, loan guarantee scheme was extended to 26 stressed sectors and healthcare
  • RBI released a pro-growth monetary policy decision. Kept Repo and Reverse Repo rate unchanged

Please click here for Monthly Equity & Debt Outlook Presentation – September 2020.

  

Key Events:

·         1Q FY21 Real GDP growth contracted by 23.9% YoY, weaker than the street estimates. Led by a strict lockdown and labor migration, construction was the worst hit, followed by trade, hotels, transport and communication. 

 

·         MPC took a pause in the rate easing cycle while refraining from giving any specific forecasts on growth & inflation given heightened uncertainty.

 

·         July’s CPI print of 6.9% (v/s 6.2% in June) drastically reduced chances of a rate cut for the rest of this fiscal year. RBI’s recent policy statement had predicted inflation to stay elevated till Sep and see moderation in 2HFY21.

 

·         India’s trade balance turned to a deficit of ~$4.8bn in July are a rare surplus of ~$0.8bn in June, as gold and other imports started to pick-up. Exports in July were down ~10% in July at $23.6bn while imports at $28.4bn.

 

·         India’s fiscal deficit stood at Rs8.2trn at the end of July, at ~103% of the budgeted target for the current fiscal year. Sharp fall in tax receipts coupled with resilient government expenditure led to the high deficit in the period.

 

·         After an erratic July, August witnessed excess rainfall of 26%, highest print since 1901. Rainfall is already at a record in states of Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh, Gujarat, and Odisha.

 

·         Indian Equities moved slightly higher (Nifty +2.8%) in August.

Please click here for Monthly Equity & Debt Outlook Presentation – August 2020

 

Key Events: 

·         Nifty (+7.5%) made new highs (breaching 200DMA & 11k for the first time since March fall) in July but more than half of its gains were contributed by just two stocks.

·         After a sharp recovery (>+50%) from April lows, activity levels peaked in early-July and were still >15% below pre-Covid levels.

·         The MPC, unanimously, kept the repo rate unchanged at 4% but retained the ‘accommodative’ stance.

·         Headline CPI moderated to 6.1% for June after peaking at 7.2% in April. Core Inflation at 5.1% was still elevated in June suggesting that despite the subdued demand, the supply disruption led CPI to spike

·         After almost 18 years, India reported a trade surplus of $0.8bn in June driven by broad-based export rebound and still weak import demand. Oil imports were suppressed by low oil, but non-oil trade improved sharply

·         Centre’s fiscal deficit during 1Q of this fiscal stood at ~83% of Budget Estimate. Reports suggested that actual fiscal deficit for FY21 could be as high as 7.6%, almost 2x budget

Weekly Market Round Up (24th December 2020 - 1st January 2021)
04/01/2021 12:49:51
Debt Market Outlook - January 2021 by Ms. Lakshmi Iyer
04/01/2021 12:49:36
Equity Market Outlook (English) - January 2021 by Mr. Nilesh Shah
04/01/2021 12:49:14
 

Contact Us

Phone

8592836999 9074594067
Email roshni.manojkumar@gmail.com
Address: Naimisharanyam
Pallippuram P.O,Cherthala, Alleppey Dist.
Kerala 688541